Vegan Keto Chocolate Chip Cookies (gluten-free, nut-free, soy-free)

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Eleven years ago, I stopped eating gluten entirely and it totally changed my digestion. I was already vegan at the time, and soon after started experimenting with ketogenic diets. Throughout the years, I’ve been looking for ways to modify my favorite vegan chocolate chip cookie recipe to be both gluten-free and keto-friendly, and for some reason, I’ve never posted about it. So, as I was indulging in making myself a batch of these vegan keto chocolate chip cookies (that are gluten-free, nut-free and soy-free, among other things), I thought I’d post about it.

The ingredients for this recipe are pretty basic, with one exception: lupin flour. I’ve been baking with lupin flour for a few years now, and really enjoy using it because of the high protein and fiber content. It also works really well in cookies, brownies and other less delicate baked goods as a flour replacement. There are some caveats, though. Lupin flour can have a pretty strong taste, so it’s important to balance that with other flavors. In the case of this cookie, that’s the vanilla, the golden sweetener, and the chocolate.

Something that is important to note with lupin flour is that it can cross-react with peanuts. So, for those with a peanut allergy, you may want to look for an alternative. I’ve got a list going in the notes below that I’ll be adding to as I do more experimenting.

The rest of the ingredients, like a granulated sugar-free sweetener or a flax seeds are fairly easy to find in most North American grocery stores these days.

Recipe Notes For Vegan Keto Chocolate Chip Cookies (gluten-free, nut-free, soy-free)

  • The net carbs for this recipe are: 13.8g total – 3.3g fiber – 9.6g sugar alcohols = 0.9g net carbs
  • The chocolate I used to calculate the macros is the Midnight Coconut from Eating Evolved, which makes a lot of keto-friendly chocolate. I also really like this brand because they have made a commitment to sourcing their chocolate ethically.
  • To learn more about the ethics of the chocolate industry (and find chocolate that is produced with the wellbeing of every member of the product chain in mind), SlaveFreeChocolate.org is a great website.
  • If you don’t want to use a flax egg, you can replace the flax with 2 tbsp of tapioca starch or 1 tbsp of whole psyllium husks, and continue with the recipe as written. Both of these recipes will turn out slightly differently, though. The tapioca starch cookies will puff up more and spread less, and the psyllium cookies will be less crispy.
  • You can also make these cookies with olive oil in place of coconut oil. If you make this substitution, you will want to make sure the dough chills completely, otherwise they will spread a lot (though they are still really good this way!).
  • For sweeteners, I prefer to use Lakanto. It’s the brand I’ve found that works best for baking, and doesn’t upset my stomach. You can save 15% if you shop on their site using the code MeatFreeKeto.
  • Keep in mind while calculating macros that certain sugar alcohols, like erythritol, should be subtracted from the total carbs!
  • While I strive to provide accurate nutrition information, there are variations across brands and types of ingredients. So, if you’re using other brands than those mentioned, your macros may be different. All nutrition info is calculated from the USDA values for each ingredient, unless a brand is specifically mentioned (or no generic listing is available), and are for information purposes only! 
a batch of vegan keto chocolate chip cookies cooling on a rack
a white plate with vegan keto chocolate chip cookies

Vegan Keto Chocolate Chip Cookies (gluten-free, nut-free, soy-free)

Print Recipe
This vegan keto version of classic chocolate chip cookies is super low in net carbs (less than 1g per cookie!) and packs a surprising amount of protein and fiber.
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings 15 cookies
Calories 98
Author Liz

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C) and line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats. Alternatively, you can bake half the batch of cookies at a time.
  • In a small mixing bowl, combine water and the flax egg together and let sit for about 5-10 minutes, until a gel forms.
  • Mix together the softened coconut oil, granulated sweetener, vanilla and the flax egg until completely combined.
  • In a separate bowl, fork-whisk the lupin flour, baking powder and salt until completely incorporated and all lumps have been smushed.
  • Stir the dry ingredients into the wet, mixing until thoroughly combined, then stir in the chocolate chips.
  • Portion into 15 equal balls, then place on your baking sheet about 2 inches (5cm) apart and bake for 12-15 minutes, until just golden around the edges.
  • Remove from the oven and let cool completely before transferring, otherwise they will crumble.

Notes

For sweeteners, I prefer to use Lakanto. It’s the brand I’ve found that works best for baking, and doesn’t upset my stomach. You can save 15% if you shop on their site using the code MeatFreeKeto.
Keep in mind while calculating macros that certain sugar alcohols, like erythritol, should be subtracted from the total carbs!
The net carbs for this recipe are:
13.8g total – 3.3g fiber – 9.6g sugar alcohols = 0.9g net carbs

Nutrition

Serving: 1cookie | Calories: 98kcal | Carbohydrates: 13.8g | Protein: 3.4g | Fat: 8.8g | Saturated Fat: 6.5g | Fiber: 3.3g | Sugar: 0.8g

Join the Conversation

  1. Can you sub lupin flour with oat flour?

  2. Can I use avocado oil or extra virgin olive oil for the coconut oil? Thank you.

    1. Hi again, Cat! 🙂 You should be able to replace the coconut oil with olive oil or avocado oil, but keep in mind, they won’t set up as well as the coconut oil, because of the saturated fat content.

      1. Hi Liz,
        So when you mean “won’t set up”, are you saying that the cookies will flattened when baked?
        Liz, I really appreciate how you write about different results when using other options. As an unseasoned baker, it is quite helpful.

        1. Hi Cat – sorry for the confusing reply before! Coconut oil is solid at room temperature, so cookies made with it will be firmer, whereas olive oil and avocado oil are liquid at room temp, and so the cookies will be softer. 🙂

          1. And thank you so much for the kind words!

          2. Liz,
            OK, I got it! Sorry about all the questions, but I just found your website and I’m copying all the recipes that interest me.
            The first one I want to make is your Vegan Cinnamon Buns. I just got to get a hold of vegan cream cheese or use your suggestion of half sunbutter and half water. I’m not vegan or keto, but love the idea of no egg or sugar…more into just baking more healthy, but yummy things!
            Thank you so much for your hard work, Liz❤️

  3. Joanne Davies says:

    I can’t get on board with the taste of any sweetener other than allulose but these cookies don’t seem to have any crunch or chew, just a sort of cakey mush when I make them with allulose. Has anyone found any work around?

    1. Hi Joanne, allulose tends to do that, unfortunately. I’ve actually been playing around with this recipe lately as I can’t tolerate any of the sweeteners any more. I’ll be sure to keep you posted!

      1. How about BochaSweet? I remember reading that someone experienced with sweeteners including erythritol, allulose and BochaSweet separately making the same cookie recipe. Erythritol was very hard after 12 hrs, allulose was soft,but BochaSweet crisped up after the 12 hrs , but didn’t brown like allulose did. I wish that I could remember what website it was, but I don’t. It was just yesterday that I read it

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